Kannapolis Development Ordinance Re-write

Earlier this week, the City of Kannapolis began a two-year process of updating their Unified Development Ordinance (Kannapolis Development Ordinance – KDO). The process started with a series of stakeholder interviews with staff to gain perspective on their experiences in Kannapolis and the region. The next step in the process should start in February 2019 with community feedback sessions.

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The main goal is to create an ordinance that is internally consistent, modernized, aligned with contemporary zoning and subdivision best practices, and more user-friendly.

To stay up to date with the process click here. REBIC will continue to stay engaged with this process and keep our members updated.

Why We’ll be Voting YES for City Bonds

Bonds

by Joe Padilla, REBIC Executive Director

Charlotte has an Affordable Housing crisis — it’s an undeniable fact. Our crisis is not unlike those faced by dozens of American cities, large and small, where a limited supply of land and rooftops pushes rents and home prices out of reach for many. It’s a unfortunate byproduct of our own success, driven by the growing appeal of a city that continues to attract more than 40 new residents a day with our high quality of life, temperate weather and strong job market.

What is also undeniable is that the need for affordable housing exists across much of the income spectrum. The U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) pegs the Charlotte MSA’s Area Median Income (AMI) right around $74,000. Using the rule of thumb that no one should spend no more than 30% of their gross income on housing, a family of four earning 80% of AMI ($56,550 a year) could pay a maximum of about $1,400 a month in order to avoid being what the government considers ‘cost burdened.’ On the lower end of the income spectrum, a family of four at 30% AMI ($35,350) shouldn’t exceed about $883 in monthly housing costs.

For any family earning below Charlotte’s Area Median Income, the challenge of finding affordable housing is very real. The City’s deficit of more than 34,000 new or renovated affordable units covers this entire spectrum of incomes — from the teachers, restaurant workers and landscapers at the upper end to the working poor toward the bottom.

There’s no silver bullet that will make this challenge go away overnight — but bold public funding investments are the most effective tool. That’s why REBIC and our member associations strongly endorse the $50 million in City Housing Bonds on this year’s ballot. The money raised through the bond issue — along with matching private investments committed by our largest corporate citizens — would go into City’s Housing Trust Fund, ensuring all Charlotte taxpayers have skin in the game when it comes to addressing our affordable housing crisis.

Some have argued that the Trust Fund should be used to exclusively address needs at the lowest end of our income spectrum, where they say it would have the greatest impact. They’ve even advocated for voting against the Housing Bond Referendum until the City commits to this strategy. But this position ignores the complex challenges of underwriting subsidized housing deals, which typically require a unit mix with rents across the income scale. And focusing exclusively on housing for families earning below 30% AMI would lead to undesirable concentrations of poverty that City leaders have vowed to avoid.

Like poverty itself, the affordable housing crisis will never fully disappear. But that doesn’t mean we can’t take steps that will produce meaningful results for thousands of our neighbors who need assistance. That’s why we’re asking members of Charlotte’s real estate community to vote YES for the City Bond Referendum on this year’s ballot.

Councilman Mitchell Hosting Town Hall on Public Sector Business Opportunities

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Huntersville Considering Independent Land Development Agency

The Town of Huntersville is considering establishing its own local development review and permitting agency, bringing in-house a variety of services now provided by Mecklenburg County.

The main services the Town would take over from LUESA include development plan review; zoning, development and erosion control inspections; and bond administration. The Town Manager told the Board this week that five new positions would need to be created to provide these services.

Board members expressed their hope that bringing land development services in house would improve efficiency and reduce plan approval time for developers. REBIC is meeting with staff and Commissioners over the coming weeks to explore the proposal and ensure a handover doesn’t negatively impact development services.

The Board of Commissioners hopes to vote on the proposal in November and begin implementation by July 2019.

Matthews Defers Action on Small Area Overlay Districts

The Matthews Town Board this week voted a second time to defer a vote on a proposal to create a new Zoning Overlay District (SAP-O) that would make the land use and development policies in three Small Area Plans enforceable on all new development, regardless of whether or not a rezoning is involved.

REBIC has been opposed to the proposal, as are a group of property owners who share our concerns about the restrictions the Overlay would place on their property. The Overlay would impact all parcels in three Small Area Plans adopted by the Town between 2014 and 2017:

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Mooresville Comprehensive Planning Public Workshops

COMMUNITY INPUT REQUESTED

one mooresville
Join the Town of Mooresville at a Public Workshop to help shape the vision and values that will guide development of Mooresville’s Comprehensive Plan and Comprehensive Transportation Plan (CTP).

The workshops will be on September 24th from 6:30-8:30 P.M. at two locations, the Charles Mack Citizen Center (215 N Main St.) and Victory Lanes Bowling Center (125 Morlake Drive).

To learn more about OneMooresville, visit their website: www.onemooresville.org

 

Matthews to Hold Community Meeting on Small Area Plans

The Town of Matthews will hold a Community Meeting this Saturday, September 22 at Matthews Town Hall (232 Matthews Station Street Matthews, NC 20815) from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. Citizens are invited to attend the meeting to learn more about the Small Area Plans and the proposed overlay.
During each session, Town staff will provide an overview of the Small Area Plan, application of the proposed overlay on the area plan, provide examples of how the overlay would impact individual properties, and answer questions.

The Matthews Town Board last month deferred a vote on a proposal to create a new Zoning Overlay District (SAP-O) that would make the land use and development policies in the three Small Area Plans enforceable on all new development, regardless of whether or not a rezoning is involved.

REBIC is opposed to the proposal, as are a group of property owners who share our concerns about the restrictions the Overlay would place on their property. The Overlay would impact all parcels in three Small Area Plans adopted by the Town between 2014 and 2017:

While a Land Use Plan serves a policy guide, a zoning overlay district has the force of law on all property in its defined geography, and supersedes any zoning rights in the underlying district. The proposed Overlay District would incorporate policies ranging from building design to lot setbacks, and apply to both new development and redevelopment in all three Small Area Plan geographies.

It is REBIC’s position that the imposition of this new Zoning Overlay, as currently drafted, will impose significant land use and development restrictions on hundreds of property owners across the Town of Matthews, dramatically adding cost and regulation that may reduce the economic value of their land. From building material and streetscape standards, to trail and open space dedications, the new requirements that would be codified through the adoption of the SAP-O ordinance will change the underlying zoning provisions on which property owners have relied upon for years, fundamentally altering their land use rights.

We are encouraging the board to postpone adoption of the Overlay District and instead work with the development community to come up with an incentive-based approach that help it achieve its land use vision, while also protecting existing zoning and property rights.

The schedule for Saturday’s Community Meeting is:
9:00 – 10:00 a.m. – E. John Street/Outer Loop Small Area Plan
10:00 – 11:00 a.m. –  Entertainment District Small Area Plan
11:00 – 12:00 p.m. – Monroe Road Small Area Plan

 

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