Charlotte Schedules Public Workshops on 2040 Comprehensive Plan

CLTFuturelogo1The City of Charlotte invites you to the Charlotte Future 2040 Vision & Values Workshop. These forums will give Charlotte residents and stakeholders the opportunity to weigh in on how Charlotte should grow, and what land use and transportation policies the City should adopt in the years ahead.

Please RSVP at the following website to attend: https://cltfuture2040.eventbrite.com/

MEETING DATES & TIMES

Tuesday, March 5, 2019
Greater Mount Sinai Baptist Church
1243 West Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28208
6pm – 8pm

Wednesday, March 6, 2019
Foundation for the Carolinas
220 North Tryon Street, Charlotte, NC 28202
12:00pm – 1:30pm

Wednesday, March 20, 2019
Simmons YMCA
6824 Democracy Drive, Charlotte, NC 28212
6pm – 8pm

Charlotte Planners Release Revised TOD Ordinance, Set Public Hearing for March 18th

The Charlotte Planning Department late last week released a revised draft of its proposed Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) Ordinance, ahead of a March 18th public hearing.

REBIC is in the process of reviewing the ordinance, which is available for download HERE. We strongly encourage any developers considering projects in the City’s transit corridors to look through the draft and provide us with any feedback you may have.

Some of the changes in the new draft include:

  • Additional Bonus Menu Options: More incentives for the inclusion of affordable housing units, including a horizontal density bonus through open space reductions and building length, and the addition of several environmental items.
  • Open Space Changes: Calculations regarding open space are revised and include an easier calculation of the amount required and revised standards to when public open space is required.
  • Public Realm Standards: Provides clarification on language regarding streetscape and future back of curb measurements, based on varying street types and a planned citywide street map.
  • Revised Townhome Language: Clarifies that townhomes are not subject to the ordinance’s aesthetic requirements, reduces open space requirement.

City Council will receive a briefing on the TOD at their regular meeting on February 25th. REBIC will continue to engage on this critical issue issue through meetings with staff and Council members in the coming weeks.

Charlotte NAIOP Members Advocate for Commercial Real Estate Issues on Capitol Hill

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NAIOP North Carolina members with Senator Thom Tillis last week in Washington

Members of the Charlotte Chapter of NAIOP traveled to Washington, D.C., last week to meet with members of Congress about issues critical to North Carolina’s commercial real estate industry. The Capitol Hill visits were part of NAIOP’s annual Chapter Leadership and Legislative Retreat, and gave Charlotte developers a chance to advocate on a range of topics, including:

  • Establishing a reasonable cost recovery period for qualified leasehold improvements;
  • Advocating for increased federal investment in our national infrastructure, including roads, ports and bridges; and,
  • Encouraging Congress to incentivize energy-efficient construction without imposing new mandates.
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NAIOP Legislative Affairs Chair Jason Moore (Rodgers Builders, center) meets with Congressman Richard Hudson on Capitol Hill

During the course of the day, NAIOP members met with Senator Thom Tillis and congressmen Richard Hudson and Patrick McHenryThanks to those NAIOP members who took time out of their busy schedules to advocate for commercial real estate priorities on Capitol Hill!

Charlotte Postpones TOD Ordinance Hearing as Draft Undergoes Revision

The Charlotte planning department has postponed a public hearing for its new Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) zoning ordinance from February 25th to March 18th, as it revises the proposal to incorporate feedback from REBIC and other stakeholder groups.

While the updated draft isn’t scheduled to be released until the week of February 18th, it is expected to include an expanded menu of incentives to encourage developers to include affordable housing, make infrastructure investments, or participate in the City’s Minority, Women and Small Business Enterprises (MWSBE) program. The current draft only offers developers an opportunity to increase their building height, which REBIC cautioned could be of limited value to developers. In a letter to City staff last month, we encouraged the inclusion of incentives that would provide variances on building length, building articulation, or required open space. Continue reading