REBIC Board of Governors Meets with Charlotte Planning Team

rebic meeting 2Earlier this week, the REBIC Board of Governor hearing from Alyson Craig, Deputy Planning Director at the City of Charlotte. Alyson recently joined the City of Charlotte’s Planning Department from the UNC Charlotte Childress-Klein Center for Real Estate, where she spent 4 years running the University’s MSRE program. She previously worked as an Investment Associate with Grubb Properties, and has experience in land acquisition and site analysis for both commercial and residential real estate.

Alyson updated the Board on Charlotte’s Unified Development Ordinance, the Planning Department Reorganization, TOD Ordinance Revisions, and the Expedited Permitting Process.

REBIC will continue to stay engaged with City staff on all proposed changes and keep its membership updated on progress.

City Planners Release New Draft of TOD Ordinance

TOD Mtg

The Charlotte Planning Department has released an updated draft of its new Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) ordinance, after hearing concerns from REBIC and other industry groups that the initial proposal was too restrictive. The new draft is still not complete — city planners are still working on additional sections that will be released with later drafts.

The four new proposed TOD districts have been renamed TOD-H1 (High Intensity), TOD-H2 (High Intensity – Transition), TOD-M1 (Moderate Intensity), and TOD-M2 (Moderate Intensity – Transition). Each district is described in greater detail beginning on Page 2 of the draft.

Planners will set up an online Comments form in the next few days where you will be able to provide your feedback on this draft. We’ll add this link to our Blog as soon as it becomes available.

The City is also hosting an information meeting on Transit-Oriented Development next Tuesday, August 14th at 6 p.m.  at the CLT Powerhouse, 1507 Camden Road. This is intended only to provide a general overview of TOD, but will be valuable for developers interested in learning about this land use type.

REBIC members and staff are in the process of reviewing the new draft, which will be discussed later this month at the City’s Ordinance Advisory Committee meeting.

You can learn more about the development of the TOD ordinance on the City’s website.

Charlotte Planning Department Launches Comprehensive Reorganization

The Charlotte Planning Department is undergoing a comprehensive reorganization, in an effort to streamline the development approval process and reduce the number of conflicts that arise between final rezoning and site plan review.

The initiative is moving forward even as Charlotte’s Unified Development Ordinance takes a step back, to allow staff to begin work on a Comprehensive Plan to guide the City’s growth over the next two decades.

Charlotte Planning Design Development - Reogranization Chart Continue reading

Charlotte Planning Director Outlines New Direction for UDO Process

Speaking to the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Planning Commission today, Charlotte Planning Director Taiwo Jaiyeoba described a new direction for the yearlong process of drafting a Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) for the City of Charlotte.

With the UDO process struggling to gain support from members of City Council, Jaiyeoba said he would like to shift the focus away from the Place Types concept to the creation of long-range comprehensive plan, while also finishing the development of a new TOD ordinance.

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City Releases TOD Ordinance Draft, Seeks Feedback from Development Industry

Light RailThe City of Charlotte has released a draft of its Transit-Oriented Development A (TOD-A) ordinance, which would allow higher-density, mixed-used development within a quarter-mile of transit stations like the CATS Blue Line.

TOD-A is the first of at least 4 transit-oriented zoning districts that the Planning Department plans to unveil in the next few months, and is intended to accommodate the highest-intensity development along the transit corridor, with allowable building heights as tall as 250′.

After setting base densities and building standards, the ordinance uses a voluntary points system to incentivize developers to meet aesthetic design, open space and affordable housing objectives through allowances for greater building heights.

City Planning is looking for feedback on the draft from the development community, before moving it though Council for adoption in early summer. Comments can be submitted online through the City’s Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) website, which also contains the full text of the ordinance.

If you have any questions in the meantime regarding the TOD Districts, please reach out to Monica Holmes in the Planning Department: monica.holmes@charlottenc.gov.

Comments are due to the City by Friday, March 23rd.

REBIC is in the process of reviewing the draft TOD-A ordinance, and will work with our partner organizations to submit formal comments before the deadline.

Congressional Budget Deal Contains Big Policy Wins for Real Estate

img_0100The federal budget deal signed by President Trump last Friday contains a number of wins for real estate, including a temporary extension of federal flood insurance and extension of tax provisions that include relief from debt forgiveness, the deductibility of mortgage insurance premiums, and several energy-efficiency related provisions.

Flood Insurance

Extends the National Flood Insurance Program until March 23, giving lawmakers time to work on longer term reauthorization and reform legislation. It also adds $27 billion in mitigation and resiliency funds to address issues arising from last year’s hurricanes. The extension makes $12 billion available under the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program to fund U.S. Army Corp of Engineers flood mitigation projects.

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City Council Talks Affordable Housing, Economic Development at Durham Retreat

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Mayor Lyles opens the 2018 City Council Planning Retreat last week in Durham

DURHAM, NC — When Mayor Vi Lyles and the Charlotte City Council arrived in Durham Wednesday afternoon for the start of their 3-day planning retreat, the stage had already been set for a fascinating interplay between a series of emerging dynamics: Young vs. Old, Millennial vs. Boomer, Revolution vs. Status Quo. And with a menu of topics on their plate ranging from affordable housing and job creation, to sewer capacity and the completion of a new Unified Development Ordinance (UDO), the conversation and debate was sure to be one for the books.

Affordable Housing dominated Day 2 of the retreat, which was held at the comfortable Washington-Duke Inn, just outside the Duke University campus. After an economic overview by the always-fascinating Wells Fargo economist Mark Vitner, council members jumped into a full-throated discussion about affordable housing and creating ‘great’ neighborhoods — without once recognizing that the two goals may, in fact, be somewhat incompatible. Some of the highlights: Continue reading